From the April 2017 Issue

Cirrus SR22T G6: More Style and Avionics

Let’s get this out of the way, shall we? Cirrus salespeople aren’t apologetic that a fully loaded 2017 SR22T GTS comes with an eye-widening invoice north of $900,000 when you tack on an extended warranty. Cirrus offers less expensive models, of course, but the turbocharged SR22T is the most popular seller. Just how many buyers would spend nearly $1 million for an unpressurized piston single, you might ask? More than you might think.


Current Issue

Garmin Flight Stream: Worth It For Some

While wireless connectivity is taken for granted outside the cockpit, it’s recently begun to see some use in the cockpit. Portable ADS-B devices connect wirelessly to our portables, but wireless communications with panel-mount, certified avionics is far less common. Garmin changed that with its RS-232-based Flight Stream 100/200 wireless hubs.

Letters from Readers: April 2017

I read the article on owning and maintaining classic and antique aircraft in the March 2017 issue of Aviation Consumer and can certainly relate to the challenges of keeping these old birds. Ours wasn’t quite as exotic as your examples—we had a polished 1949 Beech A35 Bonanza—but even with the benefit of continuous production, parts were occasionally a challenge.

Basicmed: High-Altitude Ops Killer

With nose bag in place and arms crossed at FL210 picking off the miles like nobody’s business on a Cirrus demo, I got to thinking about the FAA’s new BasicMed. Particularly, how pilots might be tempted to bend one of the rules to squeeze the most efficiency from a turbocharged airplane.

Lightspeed Zulu3: Quality Meets Comfort

In our view, Lightspeed’s recently introduced third-generation Zulu3 ANR headset is a nicely executed improvement to a product that already works well. Its predecessor—the Zulu2—excelled in a crowded market of high-end ANR models because it was simple, comfortable and had the modern features buyers want, but at a price that’s substantially cheaper than a Bose A20.

Crumped Crankcase? Lycoming Cuts Prices

Surrendering your engine to an overhaul shop has a bit of a dice roll to it. Shops quote prices for the overhauls, but they’re based on a “repairable or serviceable core.” That means a good crankshaft and a crankcase and either or both could be junk, propelling the overhaul into blank-check territory in the blink of an eye.

Washing and Polishing: DIY The Right Way

Even the best professional aircraft detailers or products won’t be able to resurrect some neglected paint finishes. That’s why it’s important to preserve the paint finish early with regular cleaning and polishing. Far from a mindless chore, there’s more to do-it-yourself cleaning jobs that you might think, including protecting expensive accessories like antennas, de-ice boots and propellers. Like any other job you might tackle yourself, there’s a right and wrong approach to cleaning the aircraft. Here’s how we would do it.

ICAO Equipment Codes: Avionics Specific

After delays, the FAA transitioned from the domestic IFR flight plan form (7233-1) to the 7233-4 International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) form this past January. It’s your ticket to flying in RVSM airspace and utilizing ADS-B services. Plus, you can use it for operating under VFR within the Washington, D.C., special flight rules area.

Piper Navajo

Regarded as one of the workhorses of general aviation, the Piper Navajo has found a substantial market in the charter business. But it’s also an appealing twin for owners who want to fly themselves in relative comfort and luxury. Like the Cessna 402, as one example, you don’t find many Navajos in private ownership, although some aircraft sales professionals we spoke with during our research told us that’s changing—and good ones sell for a premium.

Download the Full April 2017 Issue PDF

With nose bag in place and arms crossed at FL210 picking off the miles like nobody’s business on a Cirrus demo, I got to thinking about the FAA’s new BasicMed. Particularly, how pilots might be tempted to bend one of the rules to squeeze the most efficiency from a turbocharged airplane. The FAA’s advisory circular AC 68-1, which describes how pilots can exercise their certificate privileges without holding at least a Third-Class medical certificate, limits flight above 18,000 feet MSL. Tempted to crack FL180 for another 6 knots in your turbocharged Mooney? According to the advisory circular, you’d be operating outside of BasicMed privileges. There’s even a bit on flight planning.

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